[0009]Being optimistic

May you not live with regret

Do you often wonder if you only had a certain thing or if you could only get rid of this particular trouble then you could be… be happy, perhaps? Complaints about being depressed, being in an unhappy marriage, being in the wrong job, and so on, are the only socially acceptable forms of rebellion that our culture permits us to express for the alienation we feel from ourselves and the world around us. Coupled with that all-pervasive fear that life is running out of your hands like a stream of sand, it is but natural that you fear you will die without having lived. But what does it mean “to live”? Well, you’re shown every day what the good life is. Being unrealistically unencumbered by responsibilities is the hot commodity pedalled by so-called influencers. The good life is really just a good lie. A certain science measure livingness as the efficacy with which the process of life invokes an eagerness in the person who lives it such that life becomes “genuinely significant” to that person. To live then is to treat each moment with significance and be fully engrossed in it. And what of time? Must it only be like ungainly sand that infernally slips from your grasp? Time really is very experiential and personal. Think of that time when you were fully engrossed in a moment and then the series of follow-on moments that absorbed you completely with ever-increasing intensity so that time itself seemed to stretch out infinitely. In contrast, the ordinary moments when you are detached from the present, perfunctorily, in a trance, lost in misgivings of things past, time slips away, literally without the feeling of having lived it. You really have not lost anything and you haven’t lost out on anything, the lessons that the experience of life give you are universal—that you don’t lament the past and in turn, waste the present.

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